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20130115
20130123
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KQED (PBS) 36
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English 36
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
and elsewhere around the globe. israelis went to the polls in general elections today. prime minister jet -- prime minister benjamin netanyahu claimed victory after exit polls showed he would likely lead, the government with a narrow majority. our correspondent is in jerusalem with the latest. >> welcome to jerusalem after three months of a lackluster election campaign. suddenly, israeli politics came alive today about an hour before the polls closed. there was growing excitement and speculation. as expected, benjamin netanyahu is likely to lead the next government. he will be the prime minister for the next four years, but it is a weakened prime minister. his coalition did not get the number of seats it wanted. only 31, according to exit polls. that is down from the 42 that the two parties had during the last election. what kind of coalition will be formed? it could be the right and religious parties. that is not what he wants. the television presenter, his party came in second place. he said his party will not expect to be in any coalition. will it be a shaky coalition between the right
elections. he was asked if the president has met his expectations during the first term. >> he has seen the economy come up again, and the employment -- unemployment rate is still too high but i think this will improve. we're out of iraq and we are changing our policy in afghanistan, and osama bin laden is dead. the president has made a commitment to education and he is running with a 52% approval rate, and this is a good start for a second term. >> what about the critics of the president to say that the deficit has grown and he has not put his weight behind climate change. in his first address, he mentioned climate change three times. and there are still problems in the country and the criticism -- is that he has given a fabulous speech but has not followed through. >> i think some of the criticism is fair but you have to also talk about his initial priorities or challenges. he is really committed to doing something about this in the second term. the deficit is one of the most difficult issues and the president -- he does not sign the appropriation bills until they are passed by congre
. we just spent $3 billion on a presidential election and the president's appointees, most of them he makes now are most likely never to get confirmed, unlikely to get debated, certainly unlikely to get discussed and certainly unlikely to serve. >> you want to end the filibuster. what's behind that? >> senator jeff morgan would make it essential that people talk. this is what the american people want. it would encourage debate, it wouldn't push it away. >> what is your reform asking for, demanding next tuesday? >> four things. one, that the majority leader of the senate can put a bill on the floor for discussion and debate. right now he can't do that unless he has 60 votes to do that. he can't even proceed. >> number two. >> number two, nominations. the president makes nominations. there needs to be a clear way for those nominations to get discussed in a short period of time. not 30 hours of senate time, which is more than a week. but in a short period of time, they get discussed and they get a vote on nominations. number three, a conference committee. the house passes one bill. the s
... >> as for the senator's schedule tonight, he is now at the hyatt regency hotel. he will watch the election returns and then... >> ohio is gone for obama... >> it is now 11:00 on the east coast and keith, we can report history. >> barack obama is projected to be the next president. >> senator barack obama of illinois will be the next president... >> narrator: november 4, 2008. on this night, in chicago, inside barack obama's private world, the news began to sink in. >> i kept watching obama as he transformed from this young man to the next president of the united states. this was a different man. >> there are tens of thousands, maybe hundreds of thousands who have gathered in grant park in chicago. >> ladies and gentlemen, the next first family of the united states of america. >> narrator: only four years earlier, he'd been a state legislator. >> the look on his face to me looked like someone who finally understood the weight of the job that he had just won. >> almost as if the weight of the world had rested on his shoulders. >> the road ahead will be long, our climb will be steep. two wars, a plan
is already a lame duck. he's gun his second election. we've already talked about people will succeed him. by his own calculation he's got 16 months to make it his mark. he has to come out of the box, fast and energetic. he's coming out on guns, immigration, fiscal policy. he needs to push the other side defering to his judgment while he has the opportunity to do it. >> if you agree, chuck that he has left radge that he may never have again, let's just talk about the gun part of this. does he have the leverage to get all of these plans he came up with, far more specific thing than people suspected through this congress. >> because of the tragedy in connecticut this was an issue that suddenly had to be pushed through front burner unlike things like fiscal policy and immigration. and i think the answer to your question is we'll have to wait and see but there's a lot of doubters including in congress with the big things like the assault weapons ban. it's lost probably so much support that that probably won't happen. he might be able to get the university background check. that seems fairly f
is this is a real imperative. what's new, it also is now an imperative for republicans. the election results from last november made clear the republican party needs a message for latino, asian-americans and immigrant groups if they have any chance of recapturing the white house. >> scott, this is carla marinucci. what's your thoughts on this? we've seen paul ryan, marco rubio extend a hand to president obama so to speak and suggest they are ready to talk about immigration reform. what's the biggest hurdle here? >> well, i think the biggest hurdle in the end is going to be politics, of course, but the issue of citizenship. what marco rubio outlined this week and last weekend is very close to what president obama talked about in 2011. and so i think that will provide some cover for other republicans. when you've got someone like marco rubio, a rising star in the party, paul ryan, saying we're ready to do a deal here, but the devil is in the details as they always say. democrats feel very emboldened on this issue, and they're going to sort of, you know, swing for the fences. they want full legal st
that republicans should whine about. he did win the election he's entitled to try this very liberal strategy and see if it succeeds for him and if it's the way to get his agenda through. i tend to have my doubts. we're all going to find out. >> brown: rev. hamilton, by your role you get involved in all the social issues of our time. did you hear the president making a kind of aggressionive statement about, "this is the way forward for all of us" or did you hear him reaching out to embrace people, to help create that? >> i think it's a great question. i wish he had done more to reach out. in fact that was the point of my message today at the national cathedral was to say, you know, we need a new american vision that's not just democratic or not just republican. it has to be a new vision that brings people together. if we had a new vision with key strategic goals that republicans and democrats have crafted together and say this is what we're going to work together over the next ten years, it would have a huge impact on bringing americans together. i wish that he had done more of that >> brown:
and bus ride. and started selling tickets before election day >> there's nothing like being here. i mean i could watch it on television or i could sit in one of the buildings around here and probably look out at it. it's nothing like being in there. kind of like swimming. you can think about the swimming but if you're not in the pool you really can't feel it. >> suarez: for many we spoke to, it wasn't just history but this president that brought them to washington >> we don't think we've had a president like him before or will have one in my lifetime. so it's worth it to be here to pay homage to him and to his beautiful family and to the country that elected him and to the people who elected him. we're just delighted to be a part of this. >> this is history in the making. first of all from an historical perspective who wouldn't want to be here? but more importantly for me, the whole of the obama administration is everything that i hold dear >> suarez: margaret came up with her family from north carolina. for her a second inauguration for the first black president was no less exciting, no l
the state, jerry browne, a democrat, was elected governor. 30 years after he held the job in the '70s. he faced a $26 billion deficit and started making more cuts and changes like transferring inmates from the state's overcrowded prisons to county jails and closing down local redevelopment agencies using the money for the state budget. meanwhile, the economy started to improve in fits and starts bringing in more tax revenue. but it all wasn't enough. brown proposed to california voters a measure to raise income taxes on the wealthy and sales taxes for everybody. to the feun of $5.6 billion. brown campaigned vigorously from what was called proposition 30 in last november's ballot. >> let's hold up our signs. just a little bit. make sure everybody sees who we are and why we're here. >> reporter: the measured passed with 54% of the vote. california voters had actually agreed to tax themselves. with that new money beginning to come in and the recession fading a bit and previous cuts in effect, brown could declare last week that the budget deficit had vanished. >> right now for the next four y
of the world in this election in which he did well with minorities and younger voters so to the extent that his second election ratified the new obama coalition and the new shape of the electorate he so, too, hopes his second term will speak to that. and i think that was an interesting part of this speech but if you're in a republican hearing this when he talks about collective action they hear big government, when he talks about investment they hear taxes and when he talks about takers which he did in the speech, that's a loaded word. it aims right at paul ryan who talked about takers versus makers, the takers being the one who receive federal benefits but pay no federal income tax. that's a shot. that's not just language that's slipped in. so that's the sense in which this had a combative -- there were a few barbs in this speech. >> one of the moments in the campaign when the president was office balance was when he said you didn't build it, talking about small business. that was one of the big themes of the speech saying you need collective action in order to get anything done. again, not ne
everything. >> rose: and what did it change for you? >> you know, i got elected in '94 and i'm sure you remember, charlie, in 1993 you had waco, you also had ruby ridge, you had a couple of incidences, tragedies, that really inflamed the right and made gun ownership far more symbolic. for me, though, over the past year it wasn't just newtown, though newtown was really the final straw for me, the tragedy of that day, it was also the fact that a realization as a parent that it's not safe now to send our children to schools or to send them to malls or even movie theaters or religious services. that what once was the exception is now becoming the rule. we can expect these type of mass shootings as a part of american life and i personally believe it's a combination of many things frfrplt violent american culture to mental health issues to gun issues. i think that's one of three issues. ideologues on both sides will disagree with -- take exception to one or two of those problems, but for me that is not about symbolism anymore, it's about saving children's lives and if it's true that dick chen
election. they're coming off a fiscal debate at the end of the year where they feel like they didn't get anything out of it because they didn't get the spending cuts they want. they have these two things coming up in terms of the budget negotiations. and you have these automatic spending cuts that are set to go into effect at the end of february. they feel like the debt ceiling is going to be... is their leverage. they managed to usity fek tively in 2011 although if you're an economist you would say it wasn't effective and it ended up hurting the economy. politically they felt a little like they had gained some of the things that they want even though ultimately it did have a negative effect on the party. this whole battle is just going to really heat up in the next few weeks. >> woodruff: speaking of the politics of this, jake, the president did say today if this happens he thinks both parties would be blamed but in fact in the polls are showing that it appears most people would blame republicans if this happened. is that... how much is that even a factor among... in the thinking of rep
ministry. you are here for what purpose? >> i am here as you know pakistan recently hast year got elect as a peferm nent member of the security council so this month apac stand's-- and i'm here to chair an open session, open debate on counterterrorism and approach towards that. >> rose: i want to talk about all of that. are you meeting with american officials? >> i will be meeting with susan rice, but pretty much in new york, not in washington. >> what is the state of the relations. >> i think they have come a long way. if you asked me six months back that we would come this long i would say no, i would doubt it but i think it came along with a and it always takes two to tango. i think both countries have treaded very carefully, accepted each other requirements, been more aware of sensitive to each other's sort of interests opinion the within the region so i think we have come a long way. >> rose: you had experience in the united states you went to the university of massachusetts. >> yes. >> you are also a businessperson. >> what brought knew politics. your father? >> yes and i think li
to be one of the least-effective in this cycle. you have people like tim kaine easily winning elections in the state like virginia taking on the n.r.a. and you have michael bloomberg spending money on this and defeating a-rated n.r.a. candidates. so the whole calculus has changed. it used to be the n.r.a. was the one game in town on the money front and the pac front. that's changed. so there's a real cost now for standing with the n.r.a. and i that is as you would say a game changer in that regard. >> brown: dr. gold, how does it change your world? the evolving politics here and events like newtown? >> well, it's -- you know, from my perspective-- and i'm not a gun expert, obviously-- but from my perspective it's really unfortunate that it takes these kinds of events to move forward with our country to make a stronger commitment to providing for mental health care needs of our citizens. it shouldn't have to take something like this for something to become a social priority. >> brown: but now that it's here, as you were saying before, there's still going to be many, many questions about
war. >> suarez: on tonight's daily download, we look back at the 2012 election and ahead to the
.s. was having its election you had so many corporates that were saying we will keep trillions of dollars on the side lines because we have such great uncertainty about where the united states is going with the election. that uncertainty is many, many magnitudes lower than in the emerging markets. >> rose: china versus information, the idea with increasing information has the possibility of destabilizing klein? >> yeah, china actually is a growth story and a pretty strong growth story in 2013, but china is also -- >> rose: stabilized in 2012. >> because it stabilized in 2012 because they have a surplus but china is working very past to become an information economy without being an information society. they want to be a 21st century economy with a 20th century political system and we saw that right after we put the report out you suddenly had these demonstration i assure you we had no part in against censorship in china and one of the first major decisions made was the new president was to get out there and say the chinese communist party will not tolerate unorthodox situate in the press
of state is-- >> normally a republic -- formally a republic. >> five-year term elected. political parties many. i counted at least 15. gdp per capita, what do you think it is? >> probably a thousand dollars. >> $1,300. you're still with t. men and women dominantly female about four million. and airports with paved runways. how many? how many airports with paved runways in mali? >> three. >> eight. >> how many do we have with paved runways? do you know how many? >> hard to count them all. >> probably ten. >> the government has been overthrown by the military guy we trained. he grabbed power. >> secretary panetta said that the u.s. is not in a position to train the mali military because it's not a democracy. >> they defected to the al qaeda, all the guys we trained. >> are we doing this because of france or are we doing it because we know al qaeda is there? >> ultimately there's a threat to the u.s. down the road. but france is an ally and, yes, we're doing it because of france. >> primarily because of france? >> pry pearl-- >> -- pry pearl-- >> -- primarily-- >> what did lafayette do for t
in washington, d.c. and the president-elect of the american academy of child and adolescent psychiatry. she has taught and published and barry rosenfeld is professor of psychology and director of clinical training at fordham university. he is a clinical forensic psychologist, whose recent work has focused on assessing the risk of violence in patients. i barry rosenfeld, i'd like to start right there. what's the problem that we need to understand in trying to determine in advance who might be capable of violence as we saw in new toub? >> well, the essence of the problem is that it's a needle in a stay stack. so we've got almost an infinite number of people-- i shouldn't say infinite-- a very large number of people who will fit any profile we might generate and we want to find the one person who's potentially going to be homicidal. there just isn't really a way statistically to identify or clinically to identify that person with any real accuracy. >> brown: dr. joshi, does that mean such limits we can't know what can be done? >> the issue, however, is that young children and adolescents who somet
. the democratic elected president of mali was overthrown by troops who had been trained by american trainers, now there is an interim government. i mean if you can look at the government of mali, i mean it's so bad it makes the government in kabul look good by comparison. i mean this is a very dysfunctional regime that has a hard time winning the support of its people. so along with the security, you have to enhance the legitimacy of the regime so that people in the north will be able to turn away even if there is a security offensive into the north. even if the french are able to make gains in the north they're to the going to win the support of the people unless they're championing some kind of government that those people respect and right now understandably they have zero respect for the government, which exacerbated by the fact that the people in the north are twareg and you have black africans there is a lot of tribal ethnic, various other divisions. so you have to have an international push to create a more inclusive government that can win the support of the people. and something else nee
food. i mean these are people who have mastered it. he was re-elected president of the united states with over a majority of the vote. with an economy that can only be described as suffering and troubled. so he understands the politics of it. he knows that it is an uphill fight. but the reality is and police officers will tell you as well, police chiefs in particular, is it is the impulsive end. and it's the idea of multideaths at a time which is what a gun can do. i mean it's not-- we have changed the culture in this country as as far as smoking has concerned. when i was a pfc, cigarettes were $2 a carton. now it's $9 for a pack of cigarettes and there is a stigma. we don't see smoking in movies any more. we don't see that same level of social acceptance. i mean i think the culture is part of it, no doubt about it. >> if i could just one on the politics, i think the ambitiousness of the proposals was politically savvy. because it will allow a lot of senators from marginal areas who are swinging in the mid thrill to say well i'm not for the assault weapons ban, that's too far. but i
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)

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